sunshowers-sunflowers

"Her and Lost In Translation are connected to each other. They’re very much on the same wavelength. They explore a lot of the same ideas. This all makes sense since Spike Jonze and Sofia Coppola were married from 1999 to 2003 and had been together for many years before that. Sofia Coppola had already made her big personal statement in regards to love and marriage right when the couple was on the verge of divorce; Her would be Spike Jonze’s answer to those feelings. What makes it even more poignant is that Her never feels resentful or petty. It feels more like a legitimate apology. It’s an acknowledgement that, in the end, some people aren’t meant to be with each other in the long run. Some people do grow apart. Lost in Translation is about a couple on the verge of growing apart, Her is about finally letting go of the person you’ve grown apart with and moving on.”

joshwehmann

what

bbook
bbook:

Scoring a film is a delicate task. The job of the composer is to sweep us into the sonic world of the picture, allowing us to feel in tune with the characters and in the proper mindset of the story’s narrative themes, while not manipulating our emotions and ultimately serving to enhance the director’s vision. But when a film is given so much space for silence, and explores both literal and metaphorical worlds of alienation, such a feature calls for a score drenched in atmosphere—one that will impress itself deeply into the bones of the film and create a psychological landscape in which to experience the film through. And with Jonathan Glazer’s long-awaited follow up to 2004’s Birth, the visually-stunning and masterfully-crafted existential science fiction wonder Under the Skin, the film’s score holds you captive from the very start—as  if another character itself, luring you in deeper and deeper into Glazer’s haunting world.
Based on Michel Faber’s 2000 novel, Under the Skin penetrates the world of an extraterrestrial woman of unknown origin (played by Scarlett Johansson) who drives through isolated highways and city streets searching for men to seduce and prey on, then drag back to her unearthly lair of unknown darkness. And as tactile as the film is in its colors and textures, Mica Levi’s incredible score is just about as stimulating and psychologically tickling as you can get. With its schizophrenic swirl of ominous sounds, Levi has created an otherworldly hybrid between the likes of Angelo Badalamenti, Bernard Hermann, and Vangelis. Previously known for her band Micachu & The Shapes, Levi has been creating experimental music across all genres, butUnder the Skin marks her first foray into film composing—and it’s a hell of a first go at it.
COMPOSER MICA LEVI ON JONATHAN GLAZER’S UNDER THE SKIN

bbook:

Scoring a film is a delicate task. The job of the composer is to sweep us into the sonic world of the picture, allowing us to feel in tune with the characters and in the proper mindset of the story’s narrative themes, while not manipulating our emotions and ultimately serving to enhance the director’s vision. But when a film is given so much space for silence, and explores both literal and metaphorical worlds of alienation, such a feature calls for a score drenched in atmosphere—one that will impress itself deeply into the bones of the film and create a psychological landscape in which to experience the film through. And with Jonathan Glazer’s long-awaited follow up to 2004’s Birth, the visually-stunning and masterfully-crafted existential science fiction wonder Under the Skin, the film’s score holds you captive from the very start—as  if another character itself, luring you in deeper and deeper into Glazer’s haunting world.

Based on Michel Faber’s 2000 novel, Under the Skin penetrates the world of an extraterrestrial woman of unknown origin (played by Scarlett Johansson) who drives through isolated highways and city streets searching for men to seduce and prey on, then drag back to her unearthly lair of unknown darkness. And as tactile as the film is in its colors and textures, Mica Levi’s incredible score is just about as stimulating and psychologically tickling as you can get. With its schizophrenic swirl of ominous sounds, Levi has created an otherworldly hybrid between the likes of Angelo Badalamenti, Bernard Hermann, and Vangelis. Previously known for her band Micachu & The Shapes, Levi has been creating experimental music across all genres, butUnder the Skin marks her first foray into film composing—and it’s a hell of a first go at it.

COMPOSER MICA LEVI ON JONATHAN GLAZER’S UNDER THE SKIN